Volume 5, Issue 2, June 2019, Page: 50-63
Same Buildings Different Models: Further Studies in Ijo Vernacular Base Camp Architecture
Warebi Gabriel Brisibe, Department of Architecture, Rivers State University, Nkpolu-Oroworukwo, Port-Harcourt
Owajionyi Lysias Frank, Department of Architecture, Rivers State University, Nkpolu-Oroworukwo, Port-Harcourt
Received: Jul. 9, 2019;       Accepted: Aug. 7, 2019;       Published: Sep. 3, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijaaa.20190502.13      View  27      Downloads  14
Abstract
This study examines architectural change of cultures stemming from the same ethnic source split between their homeland and other Diasporas. This change may range from minor deviations to drastic shifts away from an architectural norm and the accumulation of these shifts within a time frame constitutes variations. Based on fieldwork data obtained from an earlier study of 33 migrant fishing base camps in Bayelsa and Bakassi, this paper focuses on identifying variations between base camp dwellings of Ijo migrant fishermen, in the Bakassi Peninsula in Cameroon and Bayelsa State in Nigeria. The research uses a socio-cultural, comparative case study approach to investigate the specifics of base camp dwelling designs. This approach gives opportunities to explore the extent of the variations between the built forms, in response to internal and external forces of cultural dynamism. The qualitative methodology adopted focused on ascertaining variations through exterior evaluation of the design features, materials and construction process of the base camp dwellings. The study draws on the idea of the inevitability of cultural and social change over time to test for possibilities of variations as proposed in the theories of cultural dynamism and evolution. The findings suggest that some levels of variations between base camps models have occurred over time thus supporting the aforementioned theory and this change is attributable to an agglomeration of factors, rather than a single factor.
Keywords
Vernacular, Architecture, Base Camps, Migrant Fishermen, Building Models, Ijo
To cite this article
Warebi Gabriel Brisibe, Owajionyi Lysias Frank, Same Buildings Different Models: Further Studies in Ijo Vernacular Base Camp Architecture, International Journal of Architecture, Arts and Applications. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2019, pp. 50-63. doi: 10.11648/j.ijaaa.20190502.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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